Texting While Driving

The temptation is great.  You are in your car on your way to a restaurant and running late.  You want to inform your friends — you’ll be there in 10 minutes.  You grab your phone and start texting, only to look up a few seconds later seeing the rear end of the car in front of you coming up on you fast. You slam on the brakes. Safe this time! It’s happened to pretty much everyone with a smartphone at least once.

According to the National Safety Council, crashes caused by hand-held cell phone use while driving accounts for 1.6 million accidents each year in the United States. And among those, roughly 390,000 injuries occur each year from accidents caused by texting. That means one in four accidents now in the United States are caused by texting while driving – an epidemic. When you text, you take your eyes off the road for an average of 4-6 seconds, a 400% increase of time spent with eyes off the road. Driving at 55 miles per hour in 5 seconds is the equivalent of travelling the entire length of a football field! A lot can happen in 5 seconds.

The real tragedy is that accidents caused by texting are totally preventable, and the group most likely to fall victim to the texting temptation are teenagers.  According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 20% of drivers aged 18-20 say texting does not affect their driving, and worse 30% of those aged 21-34 feel the same. And it’s no surprise that of among 3,166 people killed by distracted driving in 2017 in the United States, the largest age group represented were teens.

The top causes of distracted driving, of which texting is just one activity, include the use of GPS, adjusting music or car controls, talking on the phone, and applying makeup, so extra care needs to be applied when engaging in these other more essential actions (except for the makeup!). As an aside, drivers engage in a scary range of activities while travelling in their cars, including singing while travelling down the road and eating a meal, and cursing at other drivers — according to Pew Research.

In 2014 New Mexico made it illegal to text or talk on a phone while driving. In all but four states an officer can pull you over and ticket you just for texting or using a hand-held phone. The law however does not apply to hands-free devices, GPS, or devices integrated into the vehicle. The first fine for texting is $25, the second $40. A texting driver is legally liable for damages ensuing from an accident of their making.

If you are involved in an accident caused by a texting driver:

  • Call 911
  • Accept medical attention, even if you think you are not injured
  • Take as many photos as possible
  • Secure witness statements
  • Inform the officer you think the other driver was on their cell phone

What makes these actions so essential in this kind of accident is that it may be necessary to subpoena phone records of the driver who caused the crash. An attorney is the only person who can subpoena phone records. Prince, Schmidt, Korte and Baca can help.  Please call us for a free consultation.

 

 

 

GETTING THE MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FROM AN AUTO ACCIDENT

If you are like most people, you may have been involved in an auto accident or two in your life, your fault or not.  And like most, you think the reimbursement to you for injury or damages is non-negotiable.  Not so.  There are many actions you can take to receive the maximum amount you deserve in the aftermath of an accident.  The insurance company is committed to handing out the minimum amount reimbursement for your claim.

This first line of defense in protecting your rights is to collect evidence and information at the accident scene.  Collect names of those involved in the accident, the year, make model of their car including license plates, obtain witnesses, gather insurance info and driver’s licenses.  Call the police, but do not rely on the police to file a report, and most certainly do not admit fault.  Do not make a recorded statement to an insurance adjuster.  Do not say you were not injured.

You do not have to accept the first amount that an insurance company presents to you.  Research the value of your car and its repairs by visiting several local mechanics.  Kelly Blue Book and Edmunds are reliable online resources to help you calculate the current value of your car if the car is a total loss.  Total loss does not mean your car is a smoking heap; rather it means the cost of repairs exceeds as little as 51% of the current value of the car.  Claim a higher value for repairs. Unless your car is less than one year old, expect the insurance company to use aftermarket parts. Some companies will consider a 2-year-old car new but anything beyond that will get aftermarket and used parts. You will have to pay extra for new replacement parts.

You do not have to accept the first offer an insurance company offers you!  Ask them to justify their first offer.  Also, keeping receipts, for example for new tires and other improvements will assist in increasing the declared value of your vehicle.  Push for a higher valuation.

New Mexico is an at-fault state, meaning each driver is assigned a percentage responsibility.  Clear cut responsibility is assigned to the following accident types:

  • Rear-ending
  • Drunk driving
  • Texting while driving
  • Right of Way issues
  • Crossing the middle line
  • It gets sticky in less clear-cut situations which is why gathering information at the scene of the accident is so important.  Fault is distributed after a determination is made in proportions. For example, at a trial, the jury decides that the total amount of damages is $100,000. You were 80 percent at fault, and your opponent was 20 percent at fault. In this situation, you would be able to recover 20 percent of $100,000, which is $20,000 of damages

Keep in mind the insurance company does not want to go to court on these accidents, so a little higher value for your vehicle or its repairs is an attractive alternative to legal proceedings. You do not need to rush.  Especially when bodily injury is involved you may find that seeking legal representation is the way to go.  Prince, Schmidt, Korte and Baca is here to help you should you need legal assistance.

Top Mechanical Failures Causing Auto Accidents

New Mexico is one of the more dangerous states in which to drive, ranking 22nd of the most unsafe states to drive. But that doesn’t mean that we drive poorly. 75% of all vehicle accidents occur on rural roads, and New Mexico, with a population of just 2 million, has a large percentage of rural roads. Rural roads pose a greater danger for drivers.  It is tempting to speed on those roads less travelled, while drivers in rural areas are also less inclined to use a seat belt.

The overwhelming majority of traffic accidents are caused by failure on the part of the driver, whether it be distracted driving, driving under the influence, or just plain not following the rules of the road.

However, approximately 6% (NHTSA) of accidents are caused by mechanical failure, environment or unknown causes.  You can reduce your chances of getting involved in a car accident not only by being a good driver, but also by making sure your car is properly maintained. The following, listed in order, are the common mechanical failures leading to car accidents. This will inspire you to “run” to your auto repair shop.

Tires

Tire failure causes roughly 35% (NHTSA) of the crashes where vehicle failure was involved.  A blowout involves a sudden loss of air pressure in a tire which then pulls the vehicle sharply in one direction, resulting in loss of control.  A worn tire can cause a blowout, so can a puncture.  However, worn tires pose an additional risk, since they lose their grip, making it harder to stop or otherwise control the car, especially when it is raining. If your tires have low tread, don’t delay in replacing them with new tires.

Keeping your tires properly inflated, rotated and aligned will lengthen the lifespan of your tires, but there’s no way around it when it is time to replace those treads.  Your vehicle manual will guide you in the proper maintenance of your tires.

Brakes

Brake failure makes up around 22% (NHSTA) of all accidents involving mechanical failure.  No explanation is needed regarding the danger bad brakes pose.  That goes for bikes, planes, trains and go-carts.  If you can’t stop your vehicle, you can’t stop hitting what’s in front of you.

Brake problems by and large result from a lapse in maintenance.  If you are hearing a metallic scraping when you apply the brakes, it is definitely past time to visit the shop. Worn pads and discs will reduce stopping power.  However, a leaky brake line or an ABS malfunction can also put you at risk. Regular trips to the auto shop and brake inspection will easily let you know if your brake pads are getting thin. Once your pads have passed 30,000 miles, it’s time to start saving up for new brakes.

Steering

A steering failure is somewhat rare, but statistically is the third major cause of accidents (3%) due to mechanical failure. Anything that compromises the ability to steer, whether that be suspension problems, an engine fault, or a broken joint is regarded as a steering failure.

If you keep the vehicle in good repair, it’s not likely that a failure of this sort will put you and your loved ones in harm’s way. It’s a good idea to ask for a full vehicle inspection at least once a year using electronic diagnostic tools to check for any hidden faults your on-board computer has found.

Wipers and Lights

Wipers provide visibility when it is raining, snowing, hailing, or even when mud from the road flies up.  Ever had a juicy batch of bugs hit the window while driving, limiting visibility? Or ever tried to drive in a heavy rainstorm without windshield wipers? Replacing blades is part of basic vehicle maintenance and should be done as they start to degrade to prevent an accident. A lack of good blades on your vehicle could demonstrate that you did not maintain your vehicle properly if an accident and resulting insurance claim occurs.

The same idea applies to the lights on your vehicle. If you have a broken light, you may not be visible to other drivers, putting you and the other driver at risk. You may minimize the importance of replacing a tail light or even a fog light.  Don’t!  And if you don’t get them replaced and get in an accident it can jeopardize your chances for compensation.

402 people lost their lives in New Mexico, 2016. But overall, New Mexico can tout a decline in traffic fatalities of 28% since 1975. Way to go, New Mexico! The overall decrease in the death rate is attributed to higher awareness of the danger of drinking and driving, as well as high compliance with seat belt laws. Assuring your vehicle is in good working order and that you abide the rules of the road will keep you from becoming one of these statistics!